THÉMIS Spectropolarimetric Gallery



OBSERVATOIRE DE PARIS, NEWS RELEASE (September, 2001)
By Véronique BOMMIER & Guillaume MOLODIJ


FULL-STOKES SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF PROMINENCES (June 15, 2000)
Observation & Reduction by Frédéric Paletou
paletou@obs-nice.fr


NiI @ 676.8 nm observations of active region NOAA 9236 (November 25, 2000)
Courtesy N. MEUNIER (OMP, Tarbes)
meunier@bagn.obs-mip.fr

Nearby Continuum Spectro-image Longitudinal Magnetic Field
I_cont B//


OBSERVATIONS OF THE SO-CALLED SECOND SOLAR SPECTRUM
Observation & Reduction by Frédéric Paletou
paletou@obs-nice.fr
Thousand thanks to those who where "around" this observation:
Guillaume MOLODIJ, Manolo COLLADOS, Javier TRUJILLO BUENO,
Claude Le MEN and Arturo LOPEZ ARISTE

Linear polarization of the D2 line of NaI
April 7, 2000 - Taken approximately @ 10" from the north limb


MAGNETOMETRY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS
Images provided by Jean RAYROLE
Jean.Rayrole@obspm.fr

Continuum Intensity Spectro-image
August 20, 1999 - Field of View 120'' x 240''
Observers: A. López Ariste, J. Rayrole, M. Semel, G. Molodij, F. Paletou
Spectro-image reconstituée à partir du continu proche de l'une des raies spectrales observée
(dans ce cas à partir du domaine spectral FeI @ 630.1 nm)

Map of the Longitudinal Magnetic Field
from Circular Polarisation Analysis (Center of Gravity Method)
Carte du champ magnétique longitudinal obtenue par l'analyse de
polarisation circulaire de la lumière (méthode du centre de gravité)

Radial Velocities (from Stokes V analysis as for B//)
Carte des vitesses radiales (même méthode)


The very first inversion of spectropolarimetric data from the THÉMIS telescope can be seen @ DASOP/THÉMIS (Meudon) www-page (courtesy Dr A. López Ariste)

High Polarimetric Sensitivity

Recent results can also be seen @ DASOP/THÉMIS (Meudon) www-page

The Calima of February 26th, 2000.

Sahara dust plume Calima over the Canarias
sahara dust calima

A massive sandstorm blowing off the northwest African desert has blanketed hundreds of thousands of square miles of the eastern Atlantic Ocean with a dense cloud of Saharan sand. The massive nature of this particular storm was first seen in a SeaWiFS image on Saturday, 26 February 2000 when it reached over 1000 miles into the Atlantic. These storms and the rising warm air can lift dust 15,000 feet or so above the African deserts and then out across the Atlantic, many times reaching as far as the Caribbean where they often require the local weather services to issue air pollution alerts as was recently the case in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Recent studies by the U.S. Geological Survey have linked the decline of the coral reefs in the Caribbean to the increasing frequency and intensity of Saharan Dust events. Additionally, other studies suggest that Saharian Dust may play a role in determining the frequency and intensity of hurricanes formed in the eastern Atlantic Ocean [Text courtesy of NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center]. Additional information can be found @ SeaWIFS Project www pages.

Curator: Frédéric Paletou
E-mail: paletou@obs-nice.fr
Fax: (+33) 4 92 00 31 21
Last updated: November 21, 2001